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March 14, 2008

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I thought I was the only one having trouble with Radio Shack and getting the PCB soultion. After a lot of searching I finally found a place on the internet that carries it----Minute Man Electronics. i hope this helps!

My book just arrived today. I am so excited! I took a quick look through as soon as I got it. It looks fantastic! I can see so many techniques I want to get at already. Tonight I will linger over it, and read it front to back. Thank you for this treasure.

Thank God I still have a bottle here. They are still selling it in Australia for all those Aussies at Dick Smith.
Jen

Thanks Stephanie and Jen. Stephanie for such a wonderful book, mine arrived yesterday, it looks fabulous, I'm looking forward to making those bezels.
Thanks Jen for telling me about the book in the first place and the Dick Smith info.

I was having trouble with the PCB solution from Radio Shack etching copper or brass in the first place (I think is was old when I bought it!), so I am glad to learn of an alternative etching solution! Thanks, Stephanie, for the post!
Jean

try the site onlinesciencemal.com
for powdered ferric nitrate and chloride. this company sells small quantities (perfect for those of us who are experimenting) of these chemicals. the shipping is also reasonable. i searched high and low for cost effective means of finding these products and this company was the best source for these chemicals.i did not want to buy the
ready made form of these by mail because i hate paying shipping for things that are 99% water.

ooops thats onlinesciencemall.com

Our local Radio Shack people told us that it's an ingredient in drug manufacturing so they yanked it from their shelves exactly one week before I was there to buy it (last Saturday). Talk about being a day late and a dollar short -- then I thought how YOU must feel, poor Stephanie, after putting this wonderful book out! Yes, the technique has been shown in other books, but somehow their projects didn't motivate me to try it like yours did! I just LOVE your book, the story within the story, the evoked world of the dig -- so much more than just another jewelry project book! Congratulations!!

Our local Radio Shack people told us that it's an ingredient in drug manufacturing so they yanked it from their shelves exactly one week before I was there to buy it (last Saturday). Talk about being a day late and a dollar short -- then I thought how YOU must feel, poor Stephanie, after putting this wonderful book out! Yes, the technique has been shown in other books, but somehow their projects didn't motivate me to try it like yours did! I just LOVE your book, the story within the story, the evoked world of the dig -- so much more than just another jewelry project book! Congratulations!!

I tried the muriatic acid/hydrogen peroxide (2:1) bath today on both a clean piece of copper & a clean piece of brass stamped with black Staz-on ink. They were in the solution for about seven hours & only lightly etched the images onto the metal. I followed the directions in your explanation exactly. Any suggestions? Thanks!!!
Jean

I ran into the same trouble a few months ago with Radio Shack. I ended up getting Ferric Cloride at an electronics supply store. The kind of store where you can get circuit board supplies and capacitors and stuff...not stereo equipment or remote control cars. Dumb Radio Shack! :)

hi stephanie..i bought the only book available here locally and have read it from cover to cover (twice)It is one of the best mixed media/jewelry/art/how to books ever, i loved the "archeological journey" and have already purchased new tool/toys to try out, can't wait to start up the fire..our radio shack also had pulled the etching solution..In the meantime i found the same substitute online and couldn't wait to try it, only thing is i assumed (bad bad) it would take the same amount of time, long story short..i ended up with very funny little grayish pieces that were nearly eaten up by the acid! the learning process goes on..after trying out the basic techniques i have since advanced to the guardian cuff and all is going well so far, i am getting carried away finding new things to cast!thanks a million for sharing with all of us, i love your style and sense of adventure, zanne

Hi, I am writing in response to the use of PBS Etchant Solution. I read a comment online doing research on this, and 2 people said that it was very slow to work and not worth it. Can you tell me the pluses of working with this? Obviously, you endorse it. I am wanting to do some etching on copper for jewelry. In the Kansas City area, Radio Shack still sells it, but is $9.99 a bottle.

thanks for your help!

I have just managed to get hold of a copy of your book and am keen to try the metal etching - however, I am VERY wary of playing around with crazy chemicals (especially as I have small children) - and I don't know where to strat to look for the right materials here in the UK.

If any Brits out there have already tried it and can reassure me / give me a few pointers, that would be wonderful (you can find my email address on my blog profile)

thank you

I think its great that you suggest your readers use Cupric Chloride etching solution as an alternative to Ferric Chloride. If properly maintained its much better for the environment. If you read up a bit you'll find that unlike ferric chloride it can be regenerated and re-used over and over. Here's a link I think your readers might benefit from: http://members.optusnet.com.au/~eseychell/PCB/etching_CuCl/index.html

The site is more aimed at people wanting to make circuit boards, but it has everything you could want to know about dealing with CuCl safely.

hi Stephanie....I know that you can get gallon size containers of ferric chloride at Daniel Smith.(maybe smaller too). I guess that have it for intaglio.

I think that your recommendation is fine. Using ferric chloride to etch is the standard and traditional method. I teach metals and we use ferric chloride from Daniel Smith. one thing I might suggest is having students SUSPEND the piece in the solution instead of letting it sit on the bottom. in the classroom we cover the back of the piece with packing tape and then lower it into the solution about half way. the tape is left long enough to hang over the edge of the container so you can secure it. Because the piece is suspended upside down, the particulate that can sometimes settle on the front just falls to the bottom of the container. I've also heard that people adhere it to Styrofoam but the tape thing works pretty well.

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